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Robert Hooke tercentennnial studies by

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Published by Ashgate in Burlington, VT .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Great Britain

Subjects:

  • Hooke, Robert, 1635-1703.,
  • Hooke, Robert, 1635-1703 -- Influence.,
  • Science -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century.,
  • Scientists -- Great Britain -- Intellectual life -- 17th century.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Michael Cooper and Michael Hunter.
ContributionsCooper, Michael, 1935-, Hunter, Michael Cyril William.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQ143.H7 R63 2006
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3402387M
ISBN 10075465365X
LC Control Number2005017266

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Robert Hooke is one of the most overlooked, forgotten and underrated people of genius, maybe partly because he fell out with his contemporary Sir Isaac Newton (who didn’t?) and Newton vindictively expunged Hooke from the records of the Royal Society. This book caused a sensation when it was published, Pepys stayed up most of the night /5(17). Robert Hooke is one of the most overlooked, forgotten and underrated people of genius, maybe partly because he fell out with his contemporary Sir Isaac Newton (who didn’t?) and Newton vindictively expunged Hooke from the records of the Royal Society. This book caused a sensation when it was published, Pepys stayed up most of the night /5(31).   Robert Hooke (J –March 3, ) was a 17th-century "natural philosopher"—an early scientist—noted for a variety of observations of the natural world. But perhaps his most notable discovery came in when he looked at a sliver of cork through a microscope lens and discovered : Mary Bellis. Robert Hooke was born in the town of Freshwater, on England’s Isle of Wight, on J His parents were John Hooke, who served as curate for the local church parish, and Cecily (née Born:

Sign In. Details. Ordered, That the Book written by Robert Hooke, M.A. Fellow of this Society, Entituled, Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies, made by Magnifying Glasses, with Observations and Inquiries thereupon, Be printed by John Martyn, and James Allestry, Printers to the said Society. Novem. BROUNCKER. P.R.S. Robert Hooke was a Renaissance Man – a jack of all trades, and a master of many. He wrote one of the most significant scientific books ever written, Micrographia, and made contributions to human knowledge spanning Architecture, Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Surveying & Map Making, and the design and construction of scientific instruments. Robert Hooke has 23 books on Goodreads with ratings. Robert Hooke’s most popular book is Remarkable Books: The World's Most Beautiful and Historic Wo.

Robert Hooke FRS (/hʊk/; 28 July [O.S. 18 July] 3 March ) was an English natural philosopher, architect and polymath. His adult life comprised three distinct periods: as a scientific inquirer lacking money; achieving great wealth and standing through his reputation for hard work and scrupulous honesty following the great fire of , but eventually becoming ill and party /5. Hooke's reputation in the history of biology largely rests on his book Micrographia, published in Hooke devised the compound microscope and illumination system shown above, one of the best such microscopes of his time, and used it in his . Hooke's Microscope. This beautiful microscope was made for the famous British scientist Robert Hooke in the late s, and was one of the most elegant microscopes built during the period. Hooke illustrated the microscope in his Micrographia, one of the first detailed treatises on microscopy and imaging. There is no certainty about Robert Hooke’s appearance and stature, not least because no portrait of him has been preserved. Historically, this lack is attributed to Newton’s efforts to erase the figure of his great is certain is that this rivalry continued until the death of Hooke in , upon which the last obstacle to Newton’s appointment as president of the Royal Society.